VI – THE GREAT FESTIVALS OF THE YEAR AND THEIR REFLECTION IN SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENTS

Only one of these could be right. But who could decide whether it was the Astronomer Royal or the Church authorities? It seemed a good opportunity to test our method. Were the substances able to decide when Easter Sunday was celebrated in Nature, in the whole Cosmos? It is obvious that we cannot reproduce here all the experiments made during the time in question. All we can do is to select a series of experiments carried out with seven representative metal salts: Silver nitrate, Quicksilver chloride, Copper sulphate, Gold chloride, Iron sulphate, Tin chloride and Lead nitrate at Noon during the Spring Equinox, at Noon on the 28th of March (Easter Sunday according to the Astronomer Royal) and at Noon on April 25th (Easter Sunday according to the Church tradition). The photographic reproductions have been arranged on the various plates in such a way, that it is easy for the reader to place them on the table in the right order underneath each other, so that the eye can travel either in a horizontal direction to observe the differences expressed in the various substances used at the identical time, under the same conditions of temperature, humidity of the atmosphere and light. Or the eye can travel in a vertical direction and compare the experiments of the same substance in their variation according to the various dates. At first the description will be given following the horizontal arrangement.

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DESCRIPTION OF THE EXPERIMENTS WITH VARIOUS SUBSTANCES CARRIED OUT AT NOON THE DAY OF THE SPRING EQUINOX

Plate 25, Fig. 46, 1% Gold chloride and 1% Silver nitrate

Plate 25, Fig. 46, 1% Gold chloride and 1% Silver nitrate

Plate 25, Fig. 46, 1% Gold chloride and 1% Silver nitrate, equal quantities: the result is a pleasing picture, clear in colour, not especially rich in forms. The borderline, describing a wide curve, is intersected with tiny waves of purple-mauve. Underneath spreads a broad light yellow band. Most of the gold activity is visible’ in the more richly coloured lower part.

Plate 26, Fig. 48, 1% Gold Chloride and 1% Quicksilver chloride

Plate 26, Fig. 48, 1% Gold Chloride and 1% Quicksilver chloride

Plate 26, Fig. 48, 1% Gold Chloride and 1% Quicksilver chloride, equal quantities mixed: the original was beautifully coloured, in various shades of mauve, mostly deep purple. A strongly marked dark line runs across horizontally, forming big waves. On the crest of these waves a light mauve band is outlined. Immediately below the border line is a band of various shades in light purple. The border line describes a less wide curve than the experiment with Gold chloride and Silver nitrate; on the other hand the entire picture has been coloured through the activity of Gold chloride. We would call this, too, a pleasing result, but without any outstanding qualities.

Plate 27, Fig. 50, 1% Gold chloride and 1% Copper sulphate

Plate 27, Fig. 50, 1% Gold chloride and 1% Copper sulphate

Plate 27, Fig. 50, 1% Gold chloride and 1% Copper sulphate, equal quantities mixed: The colours of the original were clear, purple-mauve. As in the experiment with Silver nitrate, we notice at the top a broad band into which the gold colours have not penetrated. It is slightly yellow. The border line itself describes an even wider curve than in the previous experiments mentioned; its colour is pale green, indicating Copper sulphate. This experiment we would describe as uninspiring.

Plate No. 28, Fig. 52, 1% Gold chloride

Plate No. 28, Fig. 52, 1% Gold chloride

Plate No. 28, Fig. 52, 1% Gold chloride: This is a very beautiful picture, from the form principle as well as from the standpoint of the colours displayed. It is really and truly a beautiful Spring experiment. We also observe that the colours have been carried right up to the top.

Plate 29, Fig. 54, 1% Gold chloride and 1% Iron sulphate

Plate 29, Fig. 54, 1% Gold chloride and 1% Iron sulphate

Plate 29, Fig. 54, 1% Gold chloride and 1% Iron sulphate, equal quantities mixed:There is nothing uncommon in this result. The colours are clear light pink, the forms unspecific. The broad band on top is mostly due to the yellow of Iron sulphate. The border line is light yellow and only slightly curved.

Plate 30, Fig. 56, 1% Gold chloride and 1% Tin chloride

Plate 30, Fig. 56, 1% Gold chloride and 1% Tin chloride

Plate 30, Fig. 56, 1% Gold chloride and 1% Tin chloride, equal quantities mixed:here again we would say, it is a beautiful Spring picture with clear, bright colours and forms. But the forms are not so much due to the presence of tin in the mixture, as to“the character of the day,” [taking into consideration that two phenomena are reflected in these experiments: the Spring Equinox and the Full Moon] imposed by the gold influence, or we would say due to the position of the Sun, since it is the Spring Equinox. We ask the reader to compare this picture carefully with Fig. 52, Gold chloride alone. It is the gold which rules in this picture over the tin. We observe a broad light band on top and the border line is only faintly inscribed, with tiny mauve waves. The curve is strong as in Fig. 46 and 50.

Plate 31, Fig. 59, 1% Gold chloride and 1% Lead nitrate

Plate 31, Fig. 59, 1% Gold chloride and 1% Lead nitrate